Best high-limit credit cards – CNET

Big spenders may be interested in a special class of credit cards that offer higher credit limits and, often, superior rewards. When used responsibly, these cards can boost your credit score — though you’ll need a pretty solid score to get approved in the first place; interested applicants should have good to excellent credit and an overall strong financial standing. 

It’s important to note that high-limit credit cards — like all credit cards — must be used responsibly in order to pay them off. Paying off your full balance every month is the key to success — but with these cards that’s especially important. Failing to pay your balance off each month, especially with a large credit line, can lead to huge interest fees and financial devastation.

With that in mind, here are our picks for the best credit cards with higher limits.

Best overall high-limit card

Annual fee: $550 ($75 for each additional user)
Credit limit: $10,000 minimum
Reward rates: 10x on hotels, car rentals and Chase Dining booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards, 5x on flights (after the first $300) booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards, 3x points on travel, 3x on other purchased travel (after the first $300), 3x on dining, restaurants, delivery and takeout, 1 point for every dollar spent on all other purchases
Welcome bonus: 60,000 points (worth up to $900 in travel through Chase Ultimate Rewards) when you spend $3,000 in the first 3 months of account membership
Credit requirement: Good to excellent
Intro APR: N/A
APR for purchases: 16.99% to 23.99% variable

With a credit limit starting at $10,000, the Chase Sapphire Reserve is best known as a travel rewards credit card, allowing you to earn points quickly that can be redeemed for travel. But even if you’re not a frequent flyer, the points you accrue can be redeemed for merchandise, entertainment and dining. 

Like most high-limit credit cards, you’ll need good credit to qualify for this — and be willing to spend $550 on the annual fee. But the available bonuses can offset that spendy fee. A few nice features include an annual $300 statement credit to reimburse travel purchases and Priority Pass access at over 1,000 airport lounges worldwide. 

Best intro APR high-limit card

Annual fee: $0
Credit limit: $1,000 to $10,000
Reward rates: N/A
New member bonus: N/A
Bonus redemption threshold: N/A
Credit requirement: Excellent
Intro APR: 0% on purchases (18 months)
APR for purchases: 12.99% to 21.99% variable

The BankAmericard credit card is a high-limit, no-frills card. Instead of travel perks or bonuses, the card focuses on low fees. The introductory 0% APR is ideal if you have a large, upcoming purchase you’d prefer to pay off over time. You’ll have 18 months to carry the balance while you pay it down. After the introductory APR is over, the card’s fees are competitively low. There is no annual fee, and Bank of America does not charge a penalty APR if you miss a payment. 

Best high-limit card for rewards

Annual fee: $0 the first year, $95 annually following
Credit limit: $1,000 to $30,000
Reward rates: 6% back on streaming subscriptions and supermarket purchases (up to $6,000), 3% at gas stations
Welcome bonus: Up to 20% back on Amazon.com purchases made in first 6 months (up to $200 cash back), up to $150 cash back when you spend $3,000 within the first 6 months of card ownership
Credit requirement: Good to excellent
Intro APR: 0% APR for the first 12 months
APR for purchases: 13.99% to 23.99% variable

Being strategic about high spending using the right credit card could earn you free travel or significant cash back. The Blue Cash Preferred Card from American Express lets you earn money on everyday purchases, such as gasoline, grocery shopping or home entertainment. 

The card’s limit is based on creditworthiness, with an average range of $1,000 to $30,000. You can fill out a form online to find out what types of personalized American Express offers you’re prequalified for. The preapproval doesn’t affect your credit score and will give you a good idea of how much your credit line would be or if you qualify for a higher welcome bonus, or other offer.

Best high-limit card for travel

Annual fee: $95
Credit limit: $5,000 – $50,000
Reward rates: 2x miles on every dollar you spend
Welcome bonus: 60,000 bonus miles when you spend $3,000 in your first three months of card membership
Credit requirement: Good to excellent
Intro APR: N/A
APR for purchases: 17.24% – 24.49% variable APR

The Capital One Venture Rewards Card is a straightforward, easy-to-use card that lets you earn double miles for each dollar you spend. There’s no higher bonus categories to keep track of, and you can earn up to 60,000 miles when you spend $3,000 in the first 3 months. You also can earn up to a $100 statement credit for TSA Precheck or Global Entry, and you can also score travel accident insurance and rental collision insurance.

This card’s limit starts at $5,000 and has been known to go up to $50,000, depending on your credit profile. Capital One notes that you’ll need good to excellent credit in order to qualify for this card.

Best high-limit card for balance transfers

Annual fee: $0
Credit limit: Up to $15,500
Reward rates: N/A
Credit requirement: Good to excellent
Intro APR: 0% APR for 18 months
APR for purchases: 16.49% to 24.49% variable

The Wells Fargo Platinum Card has one of the most favorable balance transfer rates of all high-limit cards. Initial balance transfers have no interest for the first 18 months. If you’re approved for a higher limit, the card’s balance transfer feature is a great way to consolidate and pay off other credit card debt without incurring interest charges.

Other features include tools that help you manage your spending and cell phone protection (up to $600) against theft or damage when you pay your mobile phone bill with the card. The Wells Fargo Platinum Card doesn’t have the perks that other premium, high-limit credit cards offer, but you’re saving hundreds of dollars in annual fees.

Best high-limit card for rebuilding credit

Annual fee: $0
Credit limit: $500 to $10,000
Reward rates: 2% to 10% cash back at select retailers, 1% to 1.5% cash back for all other purchases
Credit requirement: Fair to excellent
Intro APR: N/A
APR for purchases: 12.99% to 26.99% variable

The Petal 2 Visa is the best high-limit credit card for individuals with average or fair credit. The card comes with a variable interest rate and limit that’s based on your credit score. If you have no credit or a less-than-perfect credit history, you may be approved for a lower credit limit. The good news is, Petal cards are designed to help you improve your credit and can grow with you as you rebuild. Even if you start with a lower limit, you may be able to get a credit increase after a few months of on-time payments.

Best high-limit business card

Annual fee: $595
Credit limit: None
Reward rates: 5x on flights and prepaid hotels, 1.5x on every eligible purchase of $5,000 or more and 1x on all other spending
Welcome bonus: 100,000 Membership Rewards Points (equal to $2,200) when you spend $15,000 in the first 3 months of account ownership
Credit requirement: Very good to excellent
Intro APR: N/A
APR for purchases: 14.24% to 22.24% for Pay Over Time feature

The Business Platinum Card from American Express may be the most feature-packed of all the cards reviewed. If you’re approved for a Business Platinum Card from American Express, you can probably spend as much as you need without worrying about going over the limit. However, the card isn’t technically a credit card — it’s considered a charge card instead. While charge cards have no stated credit limit, they must be paid off in full each month. 

To evolve with market changes, American Express has added business-friendly features that help cardholders better manage cash flow, such as the “Pay Over Time” feature which lets cardholders decide if they want to create “buy now, pay later” payment plans with a fixed fee, carry a balance with interest or pay in full.

Best high-limit credit cards, compared

Best overall Best high-limit card with a long intro APR period Best high-limit card for rewards Best high-limit card for travel Best high-limit card for rebuilding credit Best high-limit balance transfer card Best high-limit business card
Card name Chase Sapphire Reserve BankAmericard credit card Blue Cash Preferred Card from American Express Chase Venture Rewards Petal 2 Visa Credit Card Wells Fargo Platinum Card The Business Platinum Card from American Express
Annual fee $550 $0 $0/$95 $95 $0 $0 $595
Credit limit $10,000 minimum $1,000 to $10,000 $1,000 to $30,000 $5,000 – $50,000 $500 to $10,000 Up to $15,500 No limit
Rewards 10x on hotels, car rentals and Chase Dining booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards, 5x on flights (after the first $300) booked through Chase Ultimate Rewards 3x points on travel 3x on other purchased travel (after the first $300) 3x on dining, restaurants, delivery and takeout 1 point for every dollar spent on all other purchases N/A 20% back on Amazon.com purchases up to $200 6% back on streaming subscriptions and supermarket purchases (up to $6,000) 3% at gas stations 2x miles on every dollar spent 2% to 10% cash back at select retailers 1% to 1.5% cash back for all other purchases N/A 5x on flights and prepaid hotels 1.5x on every eligible purchase of $5,000 or more 1x on all other spending
APR 16.99% to 23.99% variable 12.99% to 21.99% variable 13.99% to 23.99% variable 17.24% to 24.49% variable 12.99% to 26.99% variable 16.49% to 24.49% variable 14.24% – 22.24% variable
Intro APR N/A 0% on purchases (18 months) 0% on purchases (12 months) N/A N/A 0% on purchases (18 months) N/A

How is my credit limit determined?

Card issuers consider many factors, but two of the most important are your income and the information in your credit report — including how many open lines of credit you have, your payment history and your credit utilization, which measures how much debt you carry versus how much credit is available to you.

Most financial experts recommend keeping your credit utilization under 30%. That means you should not carry a balance over $3,000 if you have a credit limit of $10,000. The lower your credit utilization, the more likely you’ll have a higher credit score–and a better chance to receive a high limit on new cards. 

Can I apply for a business credit card to get a higher limit?

Business credit cards often feature a higher credit limit than standard individual accounts. An Experian study found that the average limit on a business credit card was more than double that of a personal card ($56,100 vs. $26,900).

That noted, you don’t have to own a multinational corporation to apply for a business credit card. Freelancers, gig workers, small startups and home business owners are eligible. Most issuers will look at the applicant’s personal credit instead of the company’s.

How can I get approved for a higher-limit card?

Getting approved for a higher-limit card takes some preparation. First, you’ll want to pay down your other card balances before you apply to improve your credit utilization and overall credit score. 

Be sure to research which credit cards offer the highest limits for your credit profile. If you have a good credit score of 700 or higher, chances are you’ll receive a high credit limit regardless of the card you apply for. If you’re working on rebuilding your credit, it may be harder to qualify for a premium card with a high limit. Fortunately, there are high-limit cards for individuals with fair credit.

If you don’t receive the limit you were hoping for, you might be able to get the card issuer to reconsider down the road. Once you establish a positive track record of responsible spending and on-time payments, reach out to your card provider and ask for a credit increase.

Why would I want a high limit?

A higher credit limit is beneficial to your credit score. Your credit score is partially based on the ratio between your card balances vs. your available credit. If you’re approved for a credit card with a high limit, it will reduce your credit utilization ratio and improve your credit standing. 

For example, if you currently owe $6,000 on your credit cards and have a credit limit of $20,000 total, your credit utilization is 30%. If you’re approved for a credit card with a $10,000 limit, your overall credit available changes to $30,000 and your credit utilization drops to 20%. The drop in credit utilization will likely improve your credit score — and increase your chance of getting approved for a high-limit credit card.

Cards researched

  • Chase Sapphire Reserve
  • BankAmericard® credit card
  • Blue Cash Preferred® Card from American Express
  • United Club℠ Infinite Card
  • Capital One Venture Rewards Card
  • Wells Fargo Platinum card
  • Petal®- 2 Visa® Credit Card
  • American Express Black Card

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